2001 Archived News:

December 14, 2001: Professor Diane Sonnenwald reports in Silicon 2.0 magazine that distributed learning can be as effective as face-to-face
December 12, 2001: "Green Solvents for Catalysis - Environmentally Benign Reaction Media"
December 12, 2001:  Green Chemistry Institute Fellowship Announcement
December 10, 2001:  Gordon Research Conference Flyer
November 26, 2001:  NSFSTC Member Wins Fellowship
November 19, 2001:  New feature "Topics in Green Chemistry" now available in J. Chem. Ed.
November 14, 2001:  Chemistry Professor Royce Murray wins the North Carolina Award
October 29, 2001:  A&T Receives National ECO Award
October 10, 2001:  Bugs Speed Green Chemistry
September 28, 2001:  Cleaner Chemistry for Cleaner Chips: Supercritical CO2 is Latest Technique for Stripping Semiconductor Wafers
September 19, 2001:  Poised for Profits, Academia Now Patenting Saleable Finds from the Charlotte Observer
August 14, 2001: 2001 Entrepreneur of the Year Award Video
August 2, 2001:  Senator Edwards introduces Environmental Protection Legislation
July 27, 2001: Carbon Dioxide Graphs, Charts & Diagrams
July 23, 2001: Rating of Dry Cleaning Methods Currently in Use in the U.S
July 23, 2001: Gordon Research Conference
July 06, 2001:  The Gustavus John Esselen Award for Chemistry in the Public Interest Awarded to Joseph M. Desimone at Harvard University, Cambridge, MA on 29 April 2001
July 02, 2001:  CERSP Co-Sponsors Pre-College Workshop at NC A&T
June 29, 2001: Professor Royce Murray Profiled in Herald-Sun Article
June 29, 2001: The Economist Highlights Professor DeSimone and Our Center
June 29, 2001: 6 Triangle Entrepreneurs Recognized As Critical to National Entrepreneurial Market
June 20, 2001: Center Issues RFP for Fiscal 2002-2003 Funding
June 20, 2001: Center Participates in CNSF Exhibition in Washington
June 20, 2001: New video links added to North Carolina Team of MBAs Wins World's Leading Business-Plan Competition
June 14, 2001: CERSP funding during Fiscal 2002-2003
June 11, 2001: Forbes' Paper on Micelles Wins Award
June 5, 2001: New Economies Rank: Austin 2nd, RTP-Area 4th
June 1, 2001: Prof. Ruben Carbonell has been invited to serve on a panel on “The Ingredients of Innovation” at the Southern Growth Policies Board annual meeting
May 30, 2001: New Smart Board display at NC State for videoconferencing
May 15, 2001: UNC MBA team wins MOOT CORP, premier business plan competition
May 8, 2001: Lab Pictures from NC A&T Greensboro now online.
May 8, 2001: Order Virtual Lab Tour online.
May 7, 2001: Alcoa Foundation Distinguished Engineering Research Award to Prof. Ruben Carbonell.
April 30, 2001: Environmental Fellowship to NCSU Student
April 11, 2001 (no April fool): Engineer and their weird numbers - The Influence of the Horse on the Space Shuttle (or ... how the future world is build :-)
March 26, 2001. The future of chemical research and enterprise (C&E News).
March 22, 2001. NSFSTC Meeting - Research Discussion
March 22, 2001. After more than 10.000 web site visitors we changed our look today.
March 16, 2001. Articles about Denis Gray's work
March 13, 2001. Professor Shamsuddin Ilias/ NC A&T receives patent for Filtering System.
March 13, 2001. MICHAEL RUBINSTEIN elected fellow of the APS
March 9, 2001. Utah's latest weapon against fog
February 28, 2001. Nature article about Keith Johnston's work
February 28, 2001. Explore UT with W.J. Koros
February 16, 2001.  David G. Haase/NCSU elected fellow of American Physical Society
February 16, 2001.  The dates for the North Carolina NSF STC High School Teacher Workshops based on our new lab manual
February 16, 2001.  Organic Seminar 2/23/2001 12:00pm at UNC, 308 Venable Hall
February 16, 2001.  N.C. A&T State University and UNC-CH Ranked in Top 15 By Black Enterprise Magazine
February 16, 2001.  Hangers Grand Opening
February 16, 2001.  Collaboration in the Large: Using Video Conferencing to Facilitate Large Group Interaction
February 2, 2001. DeSimone recieves Gustavus John Esselen Award for Chemistry. 
January 24, 2001. NC State University, UNC-CH Receive Gift of Patents. 
January 22, 2001.  Information and Library Science Professor Diane Sonnenwald wins National Methodology Award. 
January 19, 2001.  Managing the Industry/University Cooperative Research Center: A Guide for Directors and Other Stakeholders
January 11, 2001. Reorganization of the STC Research Program
January 10, 2001.  Attention to the polymer community in the U.S.A.
January 5, 2001. ChE 810A (Supercritical CO2 Seminar)
January 5, 2001. News from the NCSU Science House: New First School Science Activity Book completed.
January 5, 2001. News from the NCSU Science House: The Center and the Burroughs Wellcome Fund co-sponsored a student science research program on Green Chemistry
News Archive Year 2000

December 12, 2001: "Green Solvents for Catalysis - Environmentally Benign Reaction Media"
 
The international conference "Green Solvents for Catalysis - Environmentally Benign Reaction Media" is scheduled for October 2002 in Germany. Invited speakers are:

        P T Anastas, White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, USA
  
     W Keim, RWTH Aachen, Germany
  
     C J Adams, The Institute of Applied Catalysis, UK
  
     E Küsters, Novartis Pharma, Switzerland
  
     H U Blaser, Solvias AG, Switzerland
  
     E J Beckman, Univ Pittsburgh, USA
  
     M Beller, Univ Rostock, Germany
  
     D J Cole-Hamilton, Univ of St Andrews, UK
  
     H Olivier-Bourbigou, Institut Francais du Petrole, France
  
     W Tumas, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA

    The first announcement and call for papers is now available at: http://www.dechema.de/gsfc2002.


December 12, 2001:  Green Chemistry Institute Fellowship Announcement
    In 2000, the Green Chemistry Institute (GCI) and the American Chemical Society (ACS) established the Joseph Breen Memorial Fund through the ACS' International Endowment Fund. This fund commemorates Joe Breen's commitment to and accomplishments for the advancement of Green Chemistry. Each year, on an annual basis, the fund awards one or more Joseph Breen Memorial Fellowships. The recipient(s) will be named as the Joseph Breen Memorial Fellows.
  
 The award funds will be used to sponsor the participation of a young international Green Chemistry scholar in a Green Chemistry technical meeting, conference or training program. For 2002 the fund will finance the travel and expenses of a young international Green Chemistry scholar to attend the Green Chemistry Gordon Research Conference in Oxford, UK, September 8-13, 2002.

   The criteria for award of this fellowship are as follows:  "Young" international scholar is defined as undergraduate and above but below the level of Assistant Professor. The fellow must have a demonstrated research or educational interest in Green Chemistry. Green Chemistry for this purpose is defined as "The discovery and design of chemical products and processes that reduce or eliminate the use and generation of hazardous substances."

  
The fellow should be prepared to give a presentation or poster on their
interest area.

   To apply for the 2002 Joseph Breen Memorial Fellowship potential recipients
should send a letter, fax or e-mail of interest to:
            Dr. Mary M. Kirchhoff
            Green Chemistry Institute
            American Chemical Society
            1155 Sixteenth Street N.W.
            Othmer Suite 330
            Washington, DC 20036
            202-872-4562 (phone)
            202-872-6206 (fax)
            e-mail: m_kirchhoff@acs.org

   The letter should include a resume and a statement of interest of no more than one page in length. The statement should express the scholar's interest in Green Chemistry, experience in the field of Green Chemistry and any special connections to the work or teachings of Joe Breen. Closing date for receipt of the resume and statement of interest will be May 10, 2002.

 

November 26, 2001:  NSFSTC Member Wins Fellowship
        Seung-Lye Kim
has won a Eugene Garfield Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship given by Beta Phi Mu, the international library & information science honor society.  The fellowship amount is $1,500.

November 19, 2001:  New feature "Topics in Green Chemistry" now available in J. Chem. Ed.
  
     A regular feature on "Topics in Green Chemistry" is introduced in the December issue of the Journal of Chemical Education (p. 1577). Submissions should have a green chemistry component and are invited in areas such as interdisciplinary courses, stand-alone courses, laboratory experiments, demonstrations, student research, incorporation into existing courses, case studies and materials development. Guidelines for submissions to the Journal of Chemical Education may be found at http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Authors/index.html All submissions should be sent to the editorial office, noting on the cover that they are intended for Topics in Green Chemistry:
   Journal of Chemical Education
   University of Wisconsin-Madison
   209 N. Brooks Street
   Madison, WI 53715-1116
 

October 29, 2001:  A&T Receives National ECO Award
           
North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University has received the 2001 Excellence in Diversity & Environmental Stewardship Award from the Environmental Careers Organization (ECO) in the academic institution category.

            Selection was based on the university¹s outstanding leadership in academic programming, demonstrated commitment to preparing students for careers in the environmental field, long standing relationship with ECO and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and overall excellence.

            ECO is a 29-year-old national, nonprofit educational, training and leadership development organization dedicated to building leadership capacity in the environmental field. Its flagship initiative is a national internship program that places hundreds of students and graduates annually at leading companies, agencies and nonprofits across the country.

            Eleven years ago, ECO launched The Diversity Initiative, which was developed to address the under representation of people of color working in the environmental field. Since that time over 1,500 aspiring environmental professionals of color from across the nation have been exposed to environmental career opportunities.

            The goal of the Interdisciplinary Waste Management Institute (WMI) at North Carolina A&T State University is to create a talented pool of students who will become leaders in environmental fields. The WMI offers a certificate program in waste management which complements the undergraduate and graduate degrees. For more information, contact Dr. Godfrey Uzochukwu, director of the Waste Management Institute, at (336) 334-7030 or uzo@ncat.edu.   

        
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September 28, 2001:  Cleaner Chemistry for Cleaner Chips: Supercritical CO2 is Latest Technique for Stripping Semiconductor Wafers, from Chemical & Engineering News, 17 September 2001:
            Add a new use - semiconductor cleaning - to the many emerging industrial applications for supercritical CO2.

           
CO2 producer Air Products & Chemicals & SC Fluids, a private equipment maker in Nashua, NH, have teamed up to complete the development of supercritical CO2 as a photoresist stripping agent for semiconductor wafers.

            Air Products says it will bring its experience in the supply, delivery & storage of high-pressure, high-purity bulk gases to the semiconductor industry.  As part of the agreement, Air Products will install 1 of SC Fluids' cleaning machines at its R&D facility in Allentown, PA.

            Supercritical CO2 is a strong solvent that has been used for years in applications such as caffeine & hops extraction.  But its "green" nature is giving rise to novel new uses in, for example, chemical synthesis & dry cleaning (C&EN, July 16, page 27).

            David Mount, SC Fluids' vice president of strategic development, says CO2 offers environmental & cost benefits to the semiconductor industry but that they are actually secondary.  The main driver in electronics, according to Mount, is that existing wet-chemical stripping techniques are reaching their theoretical limits as circuit line architecture gets smaller.  "We think that at 0.18 µm & below, wet chemistry just won't clean these things out because of surface tension & capillary force," he says.

            Supercritical CO2, on the other hand,  has "zero surface tension," he says.  "There are no features we cannot wet."

           
SC Fluids has a development relationship with IBM & last week shipped a "beta" version of its cleaning machine to IBM's research complex in East Fishkill, NY.  It's also working with ATMI, a top supplier of specialty materials & equipment to the semiconductor industry.

            At least one other company - Supercritical Systems of Freemont, Calif. - is pursuing CO2 technology as well.  Last year, it formed a joint development venture with Praxair, one of Air Products' industrial gases rivals; soon after, it was acquired by Tokyo Electron Ltd., a big semiconductor equipment company.

            Supercritical Systems President Max Biberger says the company continues to actively advance its technology & equipment.  However, he says it isn't providing progress updates "until the product is ready."

  
         Providers of conventional cleaning chemicals are watching intently.  Dana Durham, director of Ashland Specialty Chemical's ACT unit, a leading supplier of photoresist strippers, acknowledges that the new technology could be a threat.  however, he points out that the new machines both rely on traditional chemicals to do the cleaning job effectively.

            A month ago, Durham says, Ashland launched an agreement with a semiconductor equipment supplier aimed at developing chemistry tat will work with CO2 systems.  "CO2 technology is not proven but if it's successful we want to be one of the first players," he says.
  
                                                                                                                                                                                             - Michael McCoy

September 19, 2001:  Poised for Profits, Academia Now Patenting Saleable Finds from the Charlotte Observer, 10 September 2001:
            For most of their existence, universities churned out ideas and gave them away for free.
           
            They've wised up.

            Now, they're patenting their discoveries so companies have to pay to use them.  They're also starting companies of their own.

            It's another way universities - in their drive to pay for booming research operations - are acting more like businesses.

            As with the pursuit of corporate money, the efforts have sparked concerns about whether universities are becoming too commercial.  It's also generated debate about how to divvy up any profits.

            Advocates argue that such aggressive entrepreneurship is essential when state money is harder to come by and federal money isn't growing as fast.

            "We don't give away football tickets, why should we give away technology?"  says Mark Crowell, head of UNC Chapel Hill's office of technology development.

            Critics say profits from publicly funded research should go back to taxpayers.  And Congress has asked the National Institutes of Health to examine whether taxpayers get enough payback.

            "The federal government & you & me, through taxes, pay to develop an invention.  Then we give it to a company to sell back to us, so we end up paying for it twice," says Cleveland State University professor Michael Davis, who studies the issue.

            Nationally, universities earned $641 million from licensing their discoveries in 1999, according to the Association of University Technology Managers.

            Profits aren't guaranteed, however.  Carolinas universities still pour millions more into their research than they collect.  Big bucks come only from blockbuster discoveries and Carolinas universities have yet to produce one.

            Florida State University, for example, collected more than $56 million in licensing fees in 1999 because a professor there invented the cancer drug Taxol.

            In the Carolinas, the efforts are just starting to pay off.  NCSU, the most successful so far, collected $7.8 million in royalties & licensing fees in 1999, up from $1.1 million in 1991.

            The most lucrative NCSU invention is Easy Eggs, pasteurized liquid eggs that a plant sciences professor invented for restaurants.  Safer & easier to store than eggs in a shell, they have earned NCSU about $1.8 million annually, administrators said.

            It may sound like a lot but it represents only a small percentage of the school's $800 million total budget.

            But profit is not the only goal.  Administrators also want to control how their inventions are used and make sure they get to market.

            "If we create a better mousetrap or a better light bulb, we want it out there," says Michael Ronning, NCSU's assistant vice chancellor for research.

            Still, some faculty members worry that patents restrict access to knowledge.  Others say the emphasis on getting products to market is forcing professors to give up pure research that could benefit society.

            "The best research is the product of free inquiry but we're moving more toward proprietary research," says John Riddle, a history of science professor at NCSU.  "In the long run, that will harm the university."

A Cleaner Way to Dry Clean

        Universities began patenting their inventions in earnest in the 1980s after Congress passed a law that encouraged the practice.

         In the years since, the number of patents issued to U.S. universities has skyrocketed from less that 250 a year in 1980 to more than 2,000 a year today.

        More recently, universities have focused on helping professors start their own companies called spin-offs.

         "This is the fastest way to get something from the benchtop into something that actually benefits people," says Spencer Lemons, director of the office of technology asset management at Wake Forest.

         Spin-offs can also have a positive effect on the local economy.

         Technology transfer, the movement of ideas from universities to the marketplace, adds more than $33.5 billion to the US economy & supports 280,000 jobs each year according to the Association of University Technology Managers.  That's especially important in the Carolinas, as their economies move away from agriculture.

                    UNC-Charlotte's 1st spin-off, Digital Optics, now employs about 140 workers.  The company develops chips that transmit voice & data.

                    At UNC-CH professor Joe DeSimone invented a new way to dry clean clothes using carbon dioxide, which he says is less toxic & better for the environment.  he parlayed that technology into a dry-cleaning chain called Hangers that now has more than 50 franchises with one opening in Corneilus next month.

                    "I like to work on things that are relevant," he says.  "It's great now to be in the classroom & tell students about the science I did & what it means to society."

                   
The company got its start w/ $50 million in venture capital.  So far, the business has brought in about $185,000 in licensing fees & royalties, which are divided among the university, DeSimone & other inventors.

                    DeSimone declined to provide revenues but says the company is not yet profitable.

                    "The compensation back to patent owners is long term," he says.  "You have to be patient."

                   
Creating such companies comes with risk, however.  Some administrators estimate about one of every 10 spin-offs survives.

                    Still, universities often go to great lengths to help spin-offs.

                    For a recent Wake Forest pharmaceutical spin-off, for example, school administrators wrote the business plan, recruited a CEO, solicited start-up funding & conducted market research.

                    "Basically, we were the company during the early stages," Lemons says.

                    In return, the university has about 30% ownership - a stake that will pay off if the company goes public & makes it big.

Emphasis on Economics

  
                 On NC campuses, professors say the new entrepreneurial emphasis has shifted campus culture, which once stressed research purely to advance scientific knowledge

                    Universities have added technology transfer offices.  Venture capitalists are invited to tour university labs and scientists are increasingly aware of the economic possibilities in their work.

                    "It's a different world," says NCSU forestry professor Ron Sederoff"Things that are important but won't generate a profit get neglected."

                   
The push for patents, he worries, has also limited the exchange of information among scientists.  When he wanted to use a new enzyme to study the genetics of pine trees, for example, the enzyme had already been patented.  It would have cost him only a few thousand dollars to make it himself but because of the patent it cost more than $100,000, he says.

                    "It was too expensive so we just didn't pursue it," Sederoff says.  "Patents are limited monopolies.  They restrict the continued building of knowledge."

                   
Access to patented information is at the heart of a court battle over stem-cell research launched last month by nonprofit affiliated with the University of Wisconsin.  It's suing Geron Corp, which financed the research & claims it should be able to extend its licenses to give it exclusive rights to more kinds of stem cells.

                    In the Carolinas, NCSU has been the most successful at spin-offs, helping faculty members create more than 25 companies since 1990.  It ranks 4th in the nation in spin-offs, according to the Southern Growth Policies Board.

                    The school's Centennial Campus has played a large part in encouraging entrepreneurship, administrators say.

                    On the campus last month, in a corner office with floor-to-ceiling windows, NCSU professor Jay Baliga sinks into a leather swivel chair & leans across his desk.

                     "Let me tell you about our product," he says, pulling a tiny black box out of a drawer.

                     Baliga, whose work has won more than 100 patents, recently launched a company to market his latest invention, power transistors that improve the transmission of cell phone data.

                    So far, none of his inventions has brought him or the university any money, he says.

                    To ensure his newest company's success, Baliga is taking a leave from the university.

                    "I find that just publishing doesn't make a product useful to society, so I'm trying to take it to the next step," he says.  "When I invent something, I want it to be used to make people's lives better."

 

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August 2, 2001:  SENATOR EDWARDS INTRODUCES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION LEGISLATION

            WASHINGTON – Senator John Edwards on Wednesday introduced legislation to offer a tax credit to dry cleaners who use environmentally-friendly technology.

            “We want clean clothes, but not at the expense of a clean environment,” Senator Edwards told a hearing of the Senate’s Small Business Committee. “We need to make safer, cleaner technology available and affordable to small dry cleaning businesses across the country.”

             Dr. Joseph DeSimone, a professor at the University of North Carolina and N.C. State University, has developed the technology to clean clothes without dirtying the environment.  He and a group of graduate students were searching for better ways to make plastic but instead discovered a safer way to dry clean.  The method uses liquid carbon dioxide and special detergents in place of harmful solvents.

            The measure authored by Senator Edwards would give a 20 percent tax credit to dry cleaners who switch to environmentally-friendly and energy-efficient methods like the one pioneered by Dr. DeSimone.  A similar bill was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives earlier this year and has the support of Physicians for Social Responsibility and the Sierra Club.

            We can prevent pollution and protect people by promoting safer, cleaner alternatives to traditional dry cleaning,” Senator Edwards said. “This bill provides incentives, not regulations, for dry cleaners to clean up their act.” 

            Toxics and flammable solvents are used by ninety-five percent of the 35,000 dry cleaners in the country.   These solvents can leak or spill from storage tanks, contaminating the ground and water and creating a public health risk. 

            People who come in contact with high concentrations of dry cleaning chemicals may suffer dizziness, headaches, sleepiness, confusion, nausea, difficulty speaking and walking, unconsciousness and even death. Exposure may also lead to birth defects and leukemia.

            Thousands of families at Camp LeJeune Marine Base in North Carolina may have been exposed to water tainted by an off-base dry cleaner during the early 1980's.  The U.S. Public Health Service is studying these families to learn more about the adverse health effects of dry cleaning solvents.

            “Everyone–small business owners, employees, consumers and the environment–can benefit from cleaner technology,” said Senator Edwards.  “It makes sense to provide dry cleaners a modest tax incentive to do what’s right.”

 
July 23, 2001: Gordon Research Conference
   
Green Chemistry
    8-13 September 2002
    Queens College, Oxford, UK

Key themes include: New Green Synthetic Methods, Chemical Biology Elucidation, Atom Economy, Clean Oxidation, Asymmetric Catalysis, Heterogeneous Catalysis, Novel Reaction Media, Alternative Feedstocks, Solar Energy, etc.

The Co-Chairs are keen to encourage all participants in the above meeting to present a research poster. Also, selected poster presenters will be invited to make oral contributions of their very latest results. Please contact Jim Bashkin or Adrian Kybett with a 100 word (maximum) poster proposal.*

Note that registration numbers are strictly limited and registration is via application; online applications may be made at www.grc.uri.edu/attend.htm.

2002 Co-Chairs and further details:
James K Bashkin
Pharmacia Corporation R3A
800 N. Lindbergh Blvd.
St. Louis, MO 63167 USA
Tel +1 (314) 694 3244
Fax +1 (314) 694 3479
james.k.bashkin@pharmacia.com


Adrian P Kybett
Royal Society of Chemistry
Science Park, Cambridge
UK CB4 0WF
Tel +44 (0) 1223 432306
Fax +44 (0) 1223 420247
Kybetta@rsc.org

2002 Co-Vice-Chairs:
Robin D Rogers (University of Alabama, USA)
John C Warner (UMass, Boston, USA)

Past Chairs:
Paul Anastas, OSTP, Washington, DC, USA
James Clark, York, UK
Stephen DeVito, US EPA
Istvan Horvath, Budapest, Hungary
Roger Sheldon, Delft, The Netherlands
Bill Tumas, Los Alamos, USA
Tracy Williamson, EPA, Washington, DC, USA

Gordon Research Conferences, PO Box 984, West Kingston, RI 02892-0984, USA
app@grcmail.grc.uri.edu
www.grc.uri.edu/

Footnote
*See www.acs.org/education/greenchem/principles.html

Appendix
A selection of recommended Green Chemistry sites...
http://www.rsc.org/greenchem
http://www.chemsoc.org/gcn/
http://www.lanl.gov/projects/green/index.html
http://www.acs.org/education/greenchem/
http://www.epa.gov/opptintr/greenchemistry/
http://web.chem.monash.edu.au/GreenChem
www.grc.uri.edu/programs/2002/green.htm
http://bama.ua.edu/~cgm/

Finally...
We hope that this message is of interest to you and/or your colleagues.  Please accept our apologies for any cross-posting or duplicate mailing.  We have tried to send this mailing only to scientists to whom it may be of interest, or who may be kind enough to forward it to colleagues with Green Chemistry interests.  Please contact Adrian Kybett should you wish to receive no further mailing
on this subject.
July 06, 2001:  The Gustavus John Esselen Award for Chemistry in the Public Interest Awarded to Joseph M. Desimone at Harvard University, Cambridge, MA on 29 April 2001
July 02, 2001:  CERSP Co-Sponsors Pre-College Workshop at NC A&T
On June 27, 2001, the 11th Pre-College Environmental Technology and Waste Management Workshop was conducted at North Carolina A&T State University, Greensboro, N. C.  The Workshop was sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy (Savannah River Office) and the National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center for Environmentally Responsible Solvents and Processes (CERSP). 

Prof. Godrey Uzochuckwu (NC A&T), Dr. Darlene Taylor (UNC-CH) and Dr. Mary Louise Bellamy (NCSU) all of the CERSP assisted in conducting the workshop. More than 60 high school students attended.

The Waste Management Institute (WMI) offers a certificate program for students who have completed the required course work (18 credit hours) in waste management.  The certificate complements the undergraduate degree.

The WMI is supported by the following academic units at North Carolina A&T: Animal Science, Agricultural Education, Agricultural Economics, Architectural Engineering, Biology, Business Administration, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Computer Science, Construction Management & Safety, Economics, Education, Electrical Engineering, History, Human Environment and Family Science, Industrial Engineering, Mathematics, Mechanical Engineering, Nursing, Natural Resources, Physics, Political Science, Psychology and Sociology and Social Work.

June 29, 2001:  Professor Royce Murray Profiled in Herald-Sun Article
HE HAS THE RIGHT CHEMISTRY (Chapel Hill Herald 5-28-01):  After four decades at UNC, Chemistry Professor Royce Murray still loves his job, including most recently leading a task force planning the new Science Complex. "We're here to do research, teaching and service," said his colleague in chemistry, Holden Thorp. "You probably won't find someone else at the university who has done so well at all three."
http://www.heraldsun.com

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June 29, 2001:  The Economist Highlights Professor DeSimone and Our Center
Chemistry Professor Joseph DeSimone is providing an interesting model for encouraging collaboration between theoreticians and practitioners, through the Science and Technology Center for Environmentally Responsible Solvents and Processes. The Center, which includes scientists from UNC-Chapel Hill and four other universities, includes a social scientist on each of its research teams. The idea is to analyze communication patterns between the participants and to suggest improvements for making them more effective. http://www.economist.com (June 23, 2001 issue)
June 29, 2001:  6 Triangle Entrepreneurs Recognized As Critical to National Entrepreneurial Market

CHARLOTTE, June 21, 2001 – David Jessen, Partner with Ernst & Young, today announced the winners of the Carolinas’ 2001 Ernst & Young Entrepreneur Of The Year® awards at a gala event at the Hilton Charlotte & Towers.  Triangle Awards Recipients include: Dr. John Plachetka of Pozen, Dr. Joseph DeSimone of Micell Technologies, Jud Ammons of Ammons, Inc., Dr. Fred Eshelman of PPD,Jud Bowman of Pinpoint Networks, Inc. and  Roxanne Quimby of Burt’s Bees.

            The 2001 Entrepreneur Of The Year award recipients are:

            Health Products Entrepreneur Of The Year:

            Dr. John Plachetka, CEO/President, Pozen, Inc. located in Chapel Hill,

            Plachetka is recognized for his company’s innovative practice with pharmaceutical research organizations. 

Technology Entrepreneur Of The Year:

            Dr. Joseph DeSimone, Co-founder and Chairman, Micell Technologies. located in Raleigh,  DeSimone is recognized for his help in discovering cleaning solutions used in a variety of industries.

Real Estate Entrepreneur Of The Year:

          Jud Ammons, President/Owner, Ammons, Inc. located in Raleigh

            Ammons is recognized for becoming one of the largest real estate developers in the southeast.

 Health Services Entrepreneur Of The Year:

            Dr. Fred Eshelman, CEO, PPD, located in Wilmington/Durham,

            Eshelman has led PPD to become a leading global provider of discovery and development resources for the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.

E-Software Entrepreneur Of The Year:

            Jud Bowman, President, Pinpoint Networks, located in Durham,

            Bowman is recognized for delivering a broadband of applications for global service providers.

Manufacturing Entrepreneur Of The Year:

            Roxanne Quimby, President, Burt’s Bees, located in Raleigh,

            Burt’s Bees is a leading manufacturer of natural personal care products due to Quimby’s creation.

E-Business & Products

            Robert Kear, Co-founder/Chief Strategy Officer, YOUcentric, located in Charlotte,  Kear is recognized for his company’s development of a mass-customized Ebusiness relationship management software.  

Financial Services Entrepreneur Of The Year:

            Daivd Whitcomb, Founder/Chairman, Automated Trading Desk, located in Mt. Pleasant, SC Whitcomb is recognized as a leading researcher in securities market microstructure. 

Services Entrepreneur Of The Year:

            William Boyd, CEO, Muzak, located in Fort Mill, SC

            Boyd is recognized for his company’s use of Audio Architecture for businesses. 

Master Entrepreneur Of The Year:

            Dave Maguire, Chairman/CEO, KEMET Corporation, located in Greenville, SC

            For the past 40 years, Maguire has helped develop KEMET into one of the world’s leading manufacturer of tantalum capacitors.

 The banquet, held at the Charlotte Hilton & Towers, on June 21 marked the end of an intensive search to identify and recognize the Triangle’s outstanding entrepreneurs.

            The Award Recipients are now eligible to participate in the National Entrepreneur Of The Year awards program, which is designed to honor outstanding owners of fast-growing companies in the U.S..  The program recognizes entrepreneurs who have demonstrated excellence and extraordinary success in such areas as innovation, financial performance, and personal commitment to their businesses and communities.

            The national search will culminate at a black-tie awards gala in Palm Springs, California, on November 17, 2001, where national finalists and the Entrepreneur Of The Year award winners will be announced and celebrated by more than 2,000 attendees.

Previous Entrepreneur Of The Year award winners have included a virtual "Who's Who" of business leaders, such as Michael Dell of Dell Computer Corporation, Jim McCann of 1-800 Flowers, Steve Case of America Online and Howard Schultz of Starbucks Coffee.  Scott Kriens, chairman, president and CEO of Juniper Networks, which has quickly become a household name in the high-end router market, was the 2000 National Entrepreneur of the Year.

            The independent panel of judges, which selected the Award Recipients, consisted of: 

·          John Belk, CEO/Owner, Belk, Inc.

·          James Boyd, Executive Vice President/Treasurer/Chief Financial Officer, The InterTech Group, Inc.

·          Monica Doss, President, Council for Entrepreneurial Development

·          Mark Esposito, Vice President Global Sales, NASDAQ Stock Market

·          Stan Mandel, Executive Director, Angell Center for Entrepreneurship

·          Christopher Matton, Partner, Kilpatrick Stockton, LLP

·          Chuck Pringle, Chairman of the Board, South Carolina Research Authority

·          Ruth Shuck, Managing Director, First Base Ventures

·          Rollie Tillman, Director, Kenan-Flager Business School, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Founded and produced by Ernst & Young LLP and nationally co-sponsored by USA Today, CNN, the Nasdaq Stock Market, and the Kauffman Center for Entrepreneurial Leadership at the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, the awards will be sponsored locally by Kilpatrick Stockton LLP and The North Carolina Business Journal  in the search for the nation's best entrepreneurs.  Recipients of the Entrepreneur Of The Year award become lifetime members of the Entrepreneur Of The Year Hall of Fame.

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June 20, 2001:  Center Issues RFP for Fiscal 2002-2003 Funding

An RFP for Funding for Fiscal 2002-2003 was issued June 8, 2001.  An abstract and a complete RFP document are available online.  A discussion of the RFP
was held with faculty and students by videoconference on June 14.  A video
tape is available from Vicki Haithcock for those interested in responding but
unable to attend the meeting.  An RFP Form is available online for the
convenience of applicants.
 
June 20, 2001:  Center Participates in CNSF Exhibition in Washington

On June 13, 2001, Ev Baucom participated in the 7th Annual Exhibition and Reception in Washington, DC, sponsored by the Coalition for National Science Funding.  CNSF includes nine scientific societies and consortia and is supported by many others.  There were 31 exhibits.  Our STC participated in order to support NSF in its efforts to gain higher funding by demonstrating the value for the taxpayer of investment in our Center. Discussions emphasized potential applications for our fundamental science, the innovations we are bringing to education, and the critical need for federal support of long-range research in light of declining industrial expenditures in this area.

In total, offices of at least 12 members of Congress (including nine directly) and ~30 staff members were contacted.  These focused on the North Carolina delegation and members of the House Science Committee.

Deputy Director of NSF, Dr. Joseph Bordogna, also visited the exhibit.

 
June 20, 2001: New video links added to North Carolina Team of MBAs Wins World's Leading Business-Plan Competition

University of Texas Press Release

MOOT CORP® Global Champion Video Clip 

MOOT CORP® Internet Champion Video Clip

NSFSTC News Ticker Message from May 15, 2001

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June 14, 2001: CERSP funding during Fiscal 2002-2003
Download here the PowerPoint presentation (right click the link to download and save the file)

June 11, 2001: Forbes' Paper on Micelles Wins Award
The paper "Time Resolved Electron Spin Resonance of Spin Correlated
Micelle Confined Radical Pairs: Shape of the Anti-Phase Structure"
by
V.F. Tarasov and M.D.E. Forbes, has won the Sir Harold Thompson award
given by Spectrochimica Acta and Elsevier. This award was given for the
best paper published in Spectrochimica Acta in the year 2000, decided on
unanimously by the journal’s board of editors.
Congratulations Malcolm!
June 5, 2001: New Economies Rank: Austin 2nd, RTP-Area 4th
According to a recent study released by the Progressive Policy Institute, the think tank for the Democratic Leadership, the RTP-Area ranked 4th among "New Economo" cities - primarily due to the strength of its three research universities: NC State University, UNC-Chapel Hill, and Duke University.
Austin's 2nd place is mainly based on the amount of High-Tech Jobs available in the area but also in "Degrees Granted  in Science and Engineering" and the number of "Utility Patents" issued to companies or individuals.
Read full report
See overall scores

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June 1, 2001: Prof. Ruben Carbonell, Co-Director of the CERSP and Director of the Kenan Center for Utilization of CO2 in Manufacturing, has been invited to serve on a panel on “The Ingredients of Innovation” at the Southern Growth Policies Board annual meeting.  Each year, the Southern Growth Policies Board presents a conference that focuses on a significant issue of the time. This year Southern Growth presents its 2001 Annual Conference: Inventing the Knowledge Economy.   Several Governors from southern states as well as leading experts on technology commercialization and innovation will be featured speakers.  The meeting will be held from June 24-26, 2001 in Hot Springs, Arkansas. 

The topics will serve to set future public policy initiatives that are necessary to lead the South to future economic growth based on  technology innovation and commercialization.  Most of the topics of the conference revolve around the four major elements of innovation:
 
Human Capital
Financial Capital
Social Capital
Intellectual Capital

Prof. Carbonell’s presentation will deal with the integration of these four elements in the Kenan Institute support of the establishment of the Kenan Center, the NSF STC and some of the commercialization efforts that have arisen from these (Micell, DuPont’s TEFLON (tm) market development facility, Hangers, MIS) etc.  His remarks will emphasize how the work of the Kenan Center and the NSF STC exemplifies the best in the integration of these four elements for economic growth from technology. The conference web site is www.southern.org/conference.html

May 30, 2001: New Smart Board display at NC State for videoconferencing
During the May 24 NSFSTC videoconference we could use for the first time the new Smart Board at NC State in EGRC 313. This big touchscreen gives us the possibility to write direct into the screen to answer questions, to flip easily between the slides. The screen has a much higher resolution the the old TV monitors. Similar Smart Boards are in use at Austin, Chapel Hill and Greensboro.

Nael Zaki was the first user of the SmartBoard. Here, he explains the Mechanism of CO2 Demulsification and Asphaltene Solubility


Brian Novick
uses the electronic pen

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May 15, 2001: UNC MBA team wins MOOT CORP, premier business plan competition

University of Texas Press Release

MOOT CORP® Global Champion Video Clip 

MOOT CORP® Internet Champion Video Clip

The winners of the 18th annual MOOT CORP Competition held at the University of Texas at Austin May 4-5 are a team of MBA students from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Kenan-Flagler Business School.

The business plan by the UNC team was for Micell Integrated Systems, with the support of Jeff Reid, Professor Rollie Tillman and other members of the UNC Center for Entrepreneurship and Technology Venturing.  It details development of new manufacturing equipment and specialized chemistries for the microelectronics and micro-electro mechanical (MEM) industries based on Micell's carbon dioxide intellectual property. By using a carbon dioxide-based integrated solution, Micell expects to give the integrated circuits industry the ability to make more powerful and less expensive microchips, systems on chips and MEMS. (Micell is a spin-off company based on the research of Dr. Joseph DeSimone, Kenan professor at UNC and N.C. State University, and his UNC chemistry students.)

MOOT CORP, called the "Super Bowl of World Business-Plan Competition" by Business Week magazine, was created by UT-Austin for MBA students to simulate the real-world process of raising venture capital. MBAs from leading business schools around the world create business plans and present their ideas to judges from the entrepreneurial community.  The UNC-Micell team was named the Global Champion and is the first recipient of the MOOT CORP Pontoon Fund. This year, the newly formed MOOT CORP Pontoon Fund will invest $100,000 in the Global Champion. The fund will provide financing for the entrepreneurs while they are securing first-round funding and endow the MOOT CORP Program through capital gains. To qualify for the
$100,000 convertible bridge loan, the team must be committed to launching its venture.

"Winning the first prize is the culmination of a tremendous amount of hard work by the Micell Integrated Systems team," said Jeff Reid, executive director of Kenan-Flagler's Center for Entrepreneurship and Technology Venturing, “and we are proud to win Moot Corp.”

"I especially appreciate how the UNC-Chapel Hill MBAs utilized technology developed at their university as the basis for their winning venture,” said Gary M. Cadenhead, director of the MOOT CORP Program

Twenty-eight teams from around the world competed in the opening rounds and five teams made it to the finals.   More about the competition can be found at www.mootcorp.org.

May 8, 2001: Lab Pictures from NC A&T Greensboro now online.
With A&T, we have now from all four NSFSTC Universities pictures from their research labs online on our web site. [click here to see more]

 

If you would like to have a Virtual Tour on CD-ROM through the labs from UNC and NCSU, you can order it online here.

Both of this links are located on our home page, right of the Center-News box.

May 7, 2001: Alcoa Foundation Distinguished Engineering Research Award to Prof. Ruben Carbonell.
The College of Engineering and Engineering Foundation at NCSU  allocated the Alcoa Research Awards to encourage research among its faculty and to recognize research achievements. This award was made for continuing outstanding research achievements over a period of the last five years at North Carolina State University.  The award will consist of a certificate and a $5,000 cash award. 

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April 30, 2001: Environmental Fellowship to NCSU Student

NCSU Chemical Dep. Head Prof. Peter K. Kilpatrick hands over the Award to Brian Novick
(click to enlarge picture)
Keep North Carolina Clean & Beautiful, one of the state's oldest environmental education groups, awarded its prestigious Gov. and Mrs. Dan K. Moore fellowship to Brian Novick, a chemical engineering graduate student at NC State University, with a $10,000 grant. The award was at April 23 at the Friday Center, UNC-CH during the Kenan Review Meeting.

Novick  was selected by KNCCB for his academic standing, commitment to the environment and his research into the use of CO2 as an environmentally superior solvent in manufacturing coating processes.
April 11, 2001 (no April fool): Engineer and their weird numbers - The Influence of the Horse on the Space Shuttle (or ... how the future world is build :-)

The US standard railroad gauge (distance between the rails) is 4 feet 8.5 inches. That's an exceedingly odd number. Why was that gauge used?

Because that's the way they built them in England, and the US railroads were built by English expatriates.

Why did the English build them like that? Because the first rail lines were built by the same people who built the pre-railroad tramways, and that's the gauge they used.

Why did 'they' use that gauge then? Because the people who built the tramways used the same jigs and tools that they used for building wagons, which used that wheel spacing.

Okay! Why did the wagons have that particular odd wheel spacing? Well, if they tried to use any other spacing, the wagon wheels would break on some of the old, long distance roads in England, because that's the spacing of the wheel ruts.

So who built those old rutted roads? The first long distance roads in Europe (and England) were built by Imperial Rome for their legions. The roads have been used ever since.

And the ruts? The initial ruts, which everyone else had to match for fear of destroying their wagon wheels and wagons, were first made by Roman war chariots. Since the chariots were made for, or by Imperial Rome, they were all alike in the matter of wheel spacing.

Thus, we have the answer to the original question. The United States standard railroad gauge of 4 feet, 8.5 inches derives from the original specification for an Imperial Roman war chariot.

Specifications and bureaucracies live forever. So, the next time you are handed a specification and wonder which horse's rear came up with it, you may be exactly right. Because the Imperial Roman war chariots were made just wide enough to accommodate the back ends of two war horses.

Now, the twist to the story ... There's an interesting extension to the story about railroad gauges and horses' behinds.

When we see a Space Shuttle sitting on its launch pad, there are two big booster rockets attached to the sides of the main fuel tank. These are solid rocket boosters, or SRBs. The SRBs are made by Thiokol at their factory at Utah. The engineers who designed the SRBs might have preferred to make them a bit fatter, but the SRBs had to be shipped by train from the factory to the launch site. The railroad line from the factory had to run through a tunnel in the mountains. The SRBs had to fit through that tunnel. The tunnel is slightly wider than the railroad track, and the railroad track is about as wide as two horses behinds.

So, the major design feature of what is arguably the world's most advanced transportation system was determined by the width of a Horse's Rump!
 
Find more information at: The Straight Dope

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March 26, 2001. The future of chemical research and enterprise (C&E News).
The March 26, 2001 issue of Chemical and Engineering News celebrates the 125th anniversary of the American Chemical Society. Included in the issue are essays from 171 influential young chemists, engineers and business leaders describing their visions for the future of chemical research and enterprise. Among the contributors is Professor Joseph DeSimone, Director of the NSF-STC for Environmentally Responsible Solvents and Processes, who provides his thoughts on the role of entrepreneurship in chemistry and chemical engineering.
Link to C&E News Article (Acrobat Reader required)
 
March 22, 2001. NSFSTC Meeting - Research Discussion:
- See the PowerPoint Presentation online
- Download the PowerPoint slides (right click the link (PC) or Apple Click on Mac)
March 22, 2001. After more than 10.000 web site visitors we changed our look today. The modifications main goals were:
Faster Homepage
Easier Navigation
Better Color schema for printing
Larger Fonts (12 pixel)

If you have any comments or questions, please send an email to the webmasters.

March 16, 2001. Denis Gray, Professor, Psychology in the Public Interest Program, NCSU and PI with CERSP and his collaborators have recently completed an NSF-sponsored study on inter-state migration of scientists and engineers. The report examines the factors that may be contributing to the "brain drain" problem that is troubling many states across the country. The soon-to-be released report identifies factors that explain which scientists and engineers will take jobs in the state where they received their education and which will leave. It also discusses policy options for influencing these decisions. The report has been highlighted in the media including stories in the Wall Street Journal, National Public Radio and USA Today.
Check this:
Press Release
03/15/01: USA Today: Who Will Stay and Who Will Leave
02/28/01: Wall Street Journal story: "The Price of Growth" (no online link available)

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March 13, 2001. Professor Shamsuddin Ilias/ NC A&T receives patent for Filtering System.
By their nature, due to membrane fouling, most filters become less efficient during use, says a researcher at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University. For filters to achieve maximum efficiency, it is essential to disrupt the fouling process, and Dr. Shamsuddin Ilias has pioneered a way to do this.
Ilias, a Professor of Chemical Engineering and a researcher with the Center for Energy Research and Technology at North Carolina A&T State University, recently received a patent for a system, which reduces the membrane fouling process.
The patent, entitled, “Flux Enhanced Cross-Flow Membrane Filter,” allows Ilias and A&T to pursue commercialization opportunities for the process, through the university’s Office of Technology Transfer and Commercialization.
[read full article]
March 13, 2001. MICHAEL RUBINSTEIN, professor of chemistry at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, has been elected Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS), in recognition of his significant contributions in the application of physics to science and technology. This is one of the highest honors bestowed by APS, which is among the nation's oldest and most distinguished scientific societies. Rubinstein, who has been on the UNC-CH faculty since 1995, is an expert on polymer theory and is a strong contributor to the NSF STC for Environmentally Responsible Solvents and Processes. [see also article in College of Arts & Sciences]
March 9, 2001. Utah's latest weapon against fog:
A truck that sprays carbon dioxide into fog, shock-freezing the fog particles, is part of a new process the Utah Department of Transportation is using this winter to rid the state's roads of fog. The particles drop to the ground, and a saltwater solution sprayed from the back of the truck prevents the fog particles from freezing on the road. "It basically cuts a tunnel through the fog," said Amanda Covington, spokeswoman for UDOT. The tunnel lasts between five and six hours, she said.
[see also article at deseretnews.com from December 30, 2000]

Image
sprays carbon dioxide into fog

February 28, 2001. Article in Nature about Keith Johnston's work:
Keith Johnston UT Austin and Brian Korgel are collaborating in the NSF STC on a project to syntheisze, characterize and control the properties of nanoparticles in supercritical fluids. Their work on nanowire has been described in a news story in Nature (Vol 409, February 22, 2001).

Keith Johnston's lab was one of the pioneering groups that discovered a process, precipitation with a compressed fluid anti-solvent, used to control the morphology of pharmaceuticals and polymers. Organic solutions are sprayed into compressed CO2 to precipitate amorphous and crystalline polymer and pharmaceutical materials. Later he collaborated with Joe DeSimone's group (UNC at Chapel Hill) to use a homopolymer surfactant to further refine the morphology in this process. A great deal of successsful development of the technology in England by BPD has been highly visible. The technology was recently aquired by Inhale in California for $200 million. His current fundamental work on colloids and interfacial phenomena in the NSFSTC center is of great interest to this technology.
[pdf article] needs Acrobat Reader

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February 28, 2001. Explore UT with W.J. Koros. W. J. Koros's group (UT Austin) is participating in the semi-annual "Explore UT" that will be held this Saturday, March 2nd 2001. This event is sponsored by UT to reach out to the local community with information about research work at UT. Koros's group was featured on a local TV station's morning news "spot" to promote attendance at the event. The usefulness of membranes for cleaning up natural gas to allow using lower priced reserves of natural gas was noted. In the presentation this Saturday, a 30 minute lecture on membranes with "show and tell" on how to make and use membranes will be given by graduate students in Koros's group.
Check also the link: www.engr.utexas.edu/exploreut
 
TV schedule of Explore UT:
Wednesday 2/28, 9:00 pm (Central Time, = 10:00pm Eastern Time)
FOX 7 - Evening News (Channel 2 on Time Warner Cable)
"Goop, Weird Science, and Chemistry for the Kids!"
Korgel Group (see first Article of Febr. 28)

W. J. Koros is collaborating with two industrial partners on a three year project to remove low levels (10-20%) CO2 from high pressure mixtures with natural gas. The project involves one graduate student and professor at the University of Heidelberg to develop materials and membrane structures.

This project is related to, but quite different from, the work Koros is doing through the STC to remove low levels (< 1-2%) of phenol from high pressure mixtures with CO2.

The two projects are "complementary" since the NSF project focuses on high CO2 mole fractions, while the natural gas project focuses on low CO2 mole fractions. The types of membranes needed in the two high pressure applications are expected to be somewhat different in detailed properties, but both will be based on high performance polyimide materials.

February 16, 2001.  David G. Haase/NCSU elected fellow of American Physical Society.
Two North Carolina State University physicists -- Dr. David G. Haase of Cary, and Dr. Stephen P. Reynolds of Raleigh -- have been elected Fellows of the American Physical Society (APS). Election as a Fellow is awarded in recognition of significant contributions to the field of physics. It is one of the highest honors bestowed by APS, which is among the nation's oldest and most distinguished scientific societies.
- [read full story]
February 16, 2001.  The dates for the North Carolina NSF STC High School Teacher Workshops based on our new lab manual:
Raleigh, NC: The Science House at NC State University May 12; June 11, 12, 13; October 26, 27, 2001
Chapel Hill, NC: UNC Chapel Hill May 19; July 10, 11, 12; October 19, 20, 2001
Greensboro, NC: N.C. A&T State University April 21; July 16, 17, 18; November 9, 10, 2001
Raleigh, NC: Southeastern Geological Society of America (SEGSA) at The Science House - April 7

The Texas dates have not been set, but I hope to have some tentative workshop plans for that state in the very near future.

Please contact Mary Louise Bellamy (mlbellam@unity.ncsu.edu) soon if you are interested in participating in one or more of these workshops.

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February 16, 2001.  Organic Seminar 2/23/2001 12:00pm at UNC, 308 Venable Hall: Karen L. Wooley (Washington University) "Designing Nanostructured Colloids from the Inside-Out".
Check out Karen's website
February 16, 2001.  N.C. A&T State University and UNC-CH Ranked in Top 15 By Black Enterprise Magazine:
The January issue of Black Enterprise magazine places N.C. A&T State University 13th and UNC-CH 14th in its “Black Enterprise-DayStar Top 50 Colleges and Universities for African Americans” list.  UNC-CH has the highest ranking among major public universities. N.C. A&T State University in Greensboro was, at 13th, the highest rated university in the State of North Carolina.  DayStar is a research firm that gathered data for the list. 

The rankings were derived from responses to a questionnaire sent to black higher education officials at 482 four-year schools that either have black enrollments of at least 3 percent or are considered large or well-known.  The questionnaire asked recipients to rate the 482 schools based on whether they felt the schools were a good social and academic fit for African-American students.
[see also article in the UNC University Gazette]
 

February 16, 2001.  Hangers Grand Opening: Joe DeSimone (Co-Founder and Chairman, Micell Technologies, Parent Company of Hangers Cleaners) and Jade Samulski (Hangers Franchisee and Chief Operation Officer of Hangers of Chapel hill) pose with Grand Prize Winner Sharon Badar and Grand Opening Celebration on Saturday February 3, 2001.
 
- More info about HangersCleaners

- More info about Micell

 

February 16, 2001.  Collaboration in the Large: Using Video Conferencing to Facilitate Large Group Interaction; Abstract:  Large group collaboration is a strategic component of many research and development (R&D) centers today. Centers may have 50 to 100 or more participating principal investigators, undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and industry members. Because center members are geographically distributed and may not have interacted with each other previously, it can be difficult to establish and maintain collaboration among members. To address this challenge in the NSF Science and Technology Center for Environmentally Responsible Solvents and Processes, we are applying an action research approach that considers social/organizational and technical aspects of large group collaboration when establishing mechanisms to facilitate collaboration among group members. This paper describes the social, organizational and technical infrastructure and best practices that have emerged using large group video conferencing technology to support collaboration in the large. Social and organizational practices that have evolved include: facilitation before, during and after video conference meetings; the adoption of visual aids to match video conference technology constraints; and the adaptation of participant etiquette. Technical practices that have evolved include: upgrades to video conference equipment; the use of separate networks for broadcasting camera views, presentation slides, and voice; and implementing new technical operations practices to support dynamic interaction among participants at each location.
[read full report]

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February 2, 2001.  Joseph M. DeSimone, Kenan Distinguished Professor of Chemistry at UNC-Chapel Hill and Chemical Engineering at N.C. State University, has been recognized by the American Chemical Society for his leadership in the development of environmentally safe solvents. He will receive the 2001 Gustavus John Esselen Award for Chemistry in the Public Interest at the meeting of the American Chemical Society's northeastern section at Harvard University in April. The Esselen Award recognizes "a chemist whose scientific and technical work has contributed to the public well-being and thereby communicated positive values of the chemical profession."
- [More Info from UNC-CH College of Arts and Sciences News Web Site]
January 24, 2001. Eastman Chemical Donates Patents to UNC-CH and N.C. State University. 
            The patents for a process that could be used to extract vitamins from plants, vegetable oil from soybeans or caffeine from coffee have been donated by Eastman Chemical CO. of Kingsport, Tenn., to UNC-CH and N.C. State University.  The donation is the first under the new Patent Acquisition and Technology Transfer Initiative.

The Eastman patents cover an extraction process using CO2 as a solvent at high temperatures and pressures in what is known as an enhanced solubility region.  Eastman first developed the process to extract beta-carotene from algae found in the Great Salt Lake but decided not to take the technology further. The process could potentially be used to extract a wide range of substances – broadly referred to as nutraceuticals – from plants, including saw palmetto extract and lycopene from tomato skins. 

Joseph M. DeSimone, William R. Kenan, Jr, distinguished professor of chemistry at UNC-CH and chemical engineering at N.C. State University, said, “The Eastman gift is a great fit with our ongoing research program in CO2 processes.  We thank the company for giving us the opportunity to further develop this extraction technology.”

- Read NCSU news article
- Read UNC University Gazette article

January 22, 2001.  Information and Library Science Professor Diane Sonnenwald wins National Methodology Award. 
Associate Professor Diane Sonnenwald and Professor Barbara Wildermuth at UNC's top-ranked School of Information and Library Science (SILS) were recently presented a special award by the Association for Library and Information Science Education (ALISE).
Sonnenwald and Wildermuth received the Award for their paper, "Investigating Information Seeking Behavior Using the Concept of Information Horizons." This is the fifth year of the award and the first time a UNC faculty member has won it. Sonnenwald described the new method at ALISE's recent annual conference in Washington, D.C. Based on Sonnenwald's earlier theoretical work on information horizons, the method ask study participants to draw a map of the people and resources that they access when seeking information. These maps are then analyzed to discover patterns of use, and potential needs for new information systems and collaboration among resources.

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January 19, 2001.  Managing the Industry/University Cooperative Research Center: A Guide for Directors and Other Stakeholders  
A recently published book edited by Prof. Denis Gray (NCSU) provides a detailed guide to establishing and managing an industry/university cooperative research center. The book provides a cogent and practical guide
on how to manage these increasingly important and complex linkage mechanisms. Drawing upon over 20 years of experience with the highly successful National Science Foundation Industry-University Cooperative Research Center Program, the editors and authors address every critical aspect of center management from start-up through technology transfer to succession planning. Every
stakeholder group involved in these centers, including faculty, university administrators, industrial representatives, and government officials, will benefit from the experience and evaluation-based strategies and best practices covered in each chapter. Appendices provide sample schedules,
checklists, and forms that reinforce the narrative presentation and serve as templates for the legacy documents typically generated by an industry/university cooperative research center.
January 11, 2001. Reorganization of the STC Research Program
 
Prof. DeSimone's Presentation Online
(Internet Explorer and Netscape Navigator)

Download the PowerPoint presentation
(right click the link to download the file)

New students affiliation

New affiliation faculty - program - student

January 10, 2001.  Attention to the polymer community in the U.S.A.
A new program that was just introduced by the Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences (MPS) of the National Science Foundation (NSF). It is titled "MPS Internships in Public Science Education" and will provide support for undergraduate and graduate students and K-12 teachers to work with research scientists and with professionals at science centers and museums on projects of public science education. This is a great opportunity to bring to the public at large a better awareness of science and its value to society.

A brief introduction to this new activity is at: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2001/nsf0138/nsf0138.html. The full Program Solicitation is at http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2001/nsf0139/nsf0139.html. The deadline for proposal submission is April 2, 2001.

Andy Lovinger, The Division of Polymer chemistry Discussion List

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January 5, 2001. ChE 810A (Supercritical CO2 Seminar)
A new graduate course has been established for the Spring semester '01 at NC State University. The course, ChE 810A (entitled "Supercritical CO2 Seminar") will be held at 3-5PM on Thursdays in the EGRC videoconferencing room (# 313) starting January 11, 2001. The course is MANDATORY for anyone receiving NSF STC funding or support from the Kenan Center for Utilization of Carbon Dioxide in Manufacturing. For information, please contact Dr. Fedkiw or Dr. Khan in the Chemical Engineering Department immediately.
January 5, 2001. News from the NCSU Science House: New First School Science Activity Book completed.
We have just completed the first school science activity book published under the auspices of the Center for Environmentally Responsible Solvents and Processes. "Environmental Science: A Collection of Activities for the High School Classroom" includes activities from nationally recognized curriculum programs. We have selected the activities to correlate with the NC and Texas environmental science curricula. Earth/Environmental Science is a new NC high school science requirement and there is a need for good laboratory activities in the course. Scott Ragan, Sharon Cooke and Dr. Brenda Wojnowski edited the collection. The book is described at http://www.science-house.org/CO2/labbook.html

The books arrived from the printer on December 8. By the following Friday a copy was sent to the science department chairperson at each of the 450 public and private high schools in NC. An additional 80 copies were sent to Earth/Environmental Science teachers have specifically requested copies at our booth at the NC Science Teachers Association meeting. At a short ceremony at The Science House the first copies were presented to representatives of the Science Division of the NC Department of Public Instruction.

January 5, 2001. News from the NCSU Science House: The Center and the Burroughs Wellcome Fund co-sponsored a student science research program on Green Chemistry (http://www.science-house.org/StudentsFolder/greenchem/index.html).
Twenty high school students from several high schools in the Triangle region worked for ten Monday nights on experiments in environmental chemistry. The program included visits to Center and Micell labs as well as presentations by Joe DeSimone and Karen Kennedy. The web site describes the program activities and has many photos.

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News Archive Year 2000