2004 News Archive

bullet14 December 2004:  Nanoscale Soft Lithography Demonstrated
bullet09 December 2004:  DeSimone Receives Milkovich Award
bullet22 November 2004:  USA Today Reports on Green Chemistry
bullet10  November 2004:  Bothun and EXPERT Noted in AAAS Publication
bullet09 November 2004:  Jennifer Young Moves to GCI
bullet08 November 2004:  UNC-CH Ranked First in Entrepreneurship
bullet05 November 2004:  Johnston Receives Award
bullet12 October 2004:  "Inventor of Pop Rocks Candy Dies of Heart Failure" article from Record.net
bullet11 October 2004:  Professor William Holton Joins EAB
bullet12 October 2004: DeSimone Helps Lead Nanomedicine Initiative
bullet11 October 2004:  Intel Announces EUV Technology
bullet27 September 2004:  Fueling Innovation: The Role of State S & T Initiatives
bullet12 September 2004:  STC Plays Major Role in ISSF 2005
bullet11 September 2004:  CERSP Institutions Rated Among Top
bullet02 September 2004:  DeSimone to Receive ACS Award
bullet19 August 2004:  Parry Norling Joins EAB
bullet09 August 2004:  EDSTAR to Evaluate A&T Postdoc Program
bullet27 July 2004:  "A Missing Phase Found at Last?" article by Geoffrey Luckhurst published in Nature Magazine.
bullet17 June 2004:  Green Chemistry Videos Available
bullet10 June 2004:  NC A&T Introduces EXPERT Program
bullet08 June 2004:  EAB Member Honored
bullet03 June 2004:  "Examining the Future of Wafer Cleaning" from Micro Magazine
bullet02 June 2004:  Rossky Named to American Academy of Arts and Sciences
bullet01 June 2004:  RECORD NUMBER OF ENGINEERING Ph.D.s AT NC A&T STATE UNIVERSITY
bullet25 May 2004 Dr. Christine Grant Receives Presidential Award for Excellence
bullet21 May 2004:  Four New EAB Members Appointed
bullet29 April 2004:  House Passes Green Chemistry Legislation
bullet23 April 2004:  UNC Science Quad Dedicated to Murray
bullet22 April 2004:  Samulski Demonstrates Biaxial Alignment
bullet14 April 2004:  Wafer Cleaning Workshop
bullet12 April 2004:  Immersion Lithography
bullet24 March 2004:  Key Aspects of Sustainability
bullet23 March 2004:  Dr. Charles Prather to Speak
bullet22 March 2004:  Green Chemistry Legislation Introduced
bullet08 March 2004:  Live Streaming Discontinued
bullet01 March 2004:  DeSimone Speaks at Microelectronics Forum
bullet21 February 2004:  Dr. Norling Addresses CERCP on Innovation
bullet18 February 2004:  Waters Receives Sloan Fellowship
bullet16 February 2004:  "Developing SuperCritical CO2 Processing in MicroElectronics Applications" article from Micro Magazine
bullet05 February 2004:  NC State and UNC-CH Open Nanotechnology Center
bullet04 February 2004:  Skunky Beer and Microchips
bullet03 February 2004: High Pressure Safety Video
bullet02 February 2004: Science Article by Johnston Group
bullet30 January 2004:  Designing for Innovation
bullet23 January 2004:  2004 CERSP Orientation Meeting Held


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14 December 2004:  Nanoscale Soft Lithography Demonstrated
        Recent work of Prof. J. M. DeSimone and associates at the University of North Carolina –Chapel Hill was featured on the cover of the International Edition of Angewandte Chemie (2004-43/43). Photocurable, liquid perfluoropolyethers (PFPEs) have been shown to be ideal materials for nanoscale pattern transfer and imprint lithographic processes. For details click here.

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09 December 2004:  DeSimone Receives Milkovich Award
        Prof. J. M. DeSimone was recognized on November 4, 2004 by the University of Akron with an award presented annually commemorating Ralph Milkovich. The award recognizes an international figure who has made significant contributions to polymer science and engineering. DeSimone presented two lectures, one describing the CO2 technology platform and one describing use of fluoropolymers in replicating micro- and nanostructures. For details click here.

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22 November 2004:  USA Today Reports on Green Chemistry
        In November 22 on-line report, USA Today cites DeSimone's work on TEFLON in  a report on "Green Chemistry". Click here for entire report.

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10  November 2004:  Bothun and EXPERT Noted in AAAS Publication
        The EXPERT program at NCA&T State University and its director, Dr. Geoff Bothun, are highlighted in a recent article in Science's Next Wave, a publication of the American Association for Advancement of Science. Click here to access. (The article was originally published on Science's Next Wave MiSciNet:   See also the homepage at  http://nextwave.sciencemag.org/.  Thanks to AAAS for permission to reproduce this article on our website free of charge.)

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09 November 2004:  Jennifer Young Moves to GCI
       
Dr. Jennifer Young, a 2000 PhD graduate of Prof Joe DeSimone's group at UNC-CH, has left her position with E. I. du Pont to join the Green Chemistry Institute of the American Chemical Society in Washington, DC.  About her new position she says, “I am very excited about the opportunity to work in the Green Chemistry Institute with pioneers in the field such as Paul Anastas.  Though I am pleased with what I was able to contribute at DuPont, my new position will allow me to devote full time to my passion, helping to lead the revolution in Green Chemistry.  Much of today’s chemical technology is not sustainable.  I hope to help change that.”
        Dr. Young’s PhD work on synthesis and characterization of composite polymer particles in supercritical (SC) CO2 contributed to understanding of core/shell phenomena.  She also co-authored an important review article on polymerization in SCCO2 (
Chemistry Review. 1999, 99, 543-563.)
       
Jennifer is not new to supporting social causes.  While at Carolina, she and her fellow graduate students of the class of 2000 received national attention in March 2000 when they voted not to participate in an important technical meeting in South Carolina in support of the NAACP's boycott of South Carolina's flying the Confederate flag.

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08 November 2004:  UNC-CH Ranked First in Entrepreneurship

 

 

 

Related Links

 

Forbes.com

 

Carolina Entrepreneurial Initiative

Lots of universities offer degrees in business, but a new initiative at UNC fosters entrepreneurial thinking and skills throughout the liberal arts and sciences, as well as the business curriculum. That's why The Princeton Review and Forbes.com rank Carolina the nation's top university for fostering entrepreneurship.

Three factors were cited in the rankings: the launch of the Carolina Entrepreneurial Initiative (CEI) to promote entrepreneurship among faculty, staff and students across the university; a new minor in entrepreneurship in the College of Arts and Sciences; and Kenan-Flagler Business School’s undergraduate business degree with a concentration in entrepreneurship.

“Students are encouraged to participate in a variety of extracurricular activities, including the Carolina Entrepreneurship Club and Students in Free Enterprise, and to exploit school-sponsored programs like the Carolina Launch Program, designed to guide students through the process of starting up their own venture,” Forbes.com wrote in The 25 Most Entrepreneurial Campuses. “The school also partners with a number of prominent companies, including Ernst & Young, which hosts the Master Panel of Entrepreneurs, during which award-winning entrepreneurs share their stories with students."

The Carolina Launch Program is part of the CEI, an $11 million program funded in part by a grant from the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation to infuse entrepreneurial approaches to education campuswide and help faculty, staff and students at UNC launch ventures of all kinds – commercial, social and artistic.

"This is an important honor acknowledging the university’s commitment to fostering the entrepreneurial spirit that fuels the economic engine of our country and drives social change," said John D. Kasarda, director of the CEI, which involves programs across the university. "We are fortunate to benefit from the curriculum and programs of the Center for Entrepreneurial Studies and the Carolina Entrepreneurial Initiative as we spur innovation and foster entrepreneurship at UNC."

Forbes.com partnered with The Princeton Review, which compiled data from 357 top colleges and universities nationwide, asking a series of questions about how they encourage and train undergraduate students to become successful entrepreneurs.

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05 November 2004:Johnston Receives Award
        Dr. Johnston is a leader in utilizing industrial gases in chemical processing and in drug delivery.  He has made seminal contributions in drug delivery in the formation of nanoparticles of proteins and poorly water soluble drugs, in the use of compressed gases in inorganic nanoparticle synthesis and assembly, and in polymer processing.  His group’s innovative discoveries have spawned research programs in numerous laboratories throughout the world and led to commercial processes including formation of pharmaceutical nanoparticles, synthesis of Si nanoparticles and nanowires, CO­2 dry cleaning, CO2 processing of low k dielectric insulators in semiconductor manufacturing and supercritical water oxidation (EcoWaste systems).  The work has been sponsored by the National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy, the Dow Chemical Company, the Welch Foundation, the Separations Research Program, Texas Materials Institute and Center for Nano- and Molecular Science at UT. He is the Vice-President of the Int. Soc. for the Advancement of Supercritical Fluids and directs UT’s efforts in a multi-university NSF Science and Technology Center on Environmentally Responsible Solvents and Processes. 

Research Innovation that has been Commercialized
Group IV Semiconductor Nanocrystals
In a collaboration with Brian Korgel, large quantities of robust, highly crystalline, organic-monolayer passivated silicon and germanium nanocrystals and nanowires were synthesized in compressed fluids above 400 oC.  At the high temperatures needed for crystallization, these fluids provide solvation of a steric stabilizer to arrest particle growth.  The smallest nanocrystals, 1.5 nm in diameter, exhibit discrete optical transitions and luminescence quantum yields up to 23%, far above earlier values.  This discovery was a finalist in the Discover Magazine Awards for Technological Innovation in 2001.  These Si nanoparticles and nanowires are being investigated in optoelectronic devices in a start-up company, Innovalight, which has licensed the technology.
 

Protein drug delivery and rapidly dissolving poorly water soluble drugs 
        Johnston’s group introduced in 1993 a new CO2-based process, precipitation with a compressed antisolvent, for the formation of  submicron and micron sized materials of a wide variety of inorganic and organic materials including pharmaceuticals.  This technology was further developed in England by Peter York and licensed to Inhale Therapeutics (now Nektar) for $250,000,000.  Recently, Johnston’s group, in collaboration with Bill Williams in UT-Pharmacy, has invented a process, spray freezing into liquid (SFL), for producing high surface area drug nanoparticles for both stable proteins and poorly water soluble drugs.  Dow has provided them $2,000,000 in research support, licensed the technology and used it to start a new business, Bioaqueous, to achieve high dissolution rates of poorly water soluble drugs. 
 

Surfactants for Reactions, Separations, and Materials Processing in CO2
        CO2 with no surface tension is being exploited in microelectronics processing to prevent image collapse of photoresists due to capillary forces as features sizes shrink below 150 nm.  Johnston has designed surfactants to make CO2 based processes viable for drying of photoresists without collapse, and cleaning and repairing porous low k dielectric insulators. He is collaborating with Peter Green in chemical engineering, Sematech, Motorola and Micell Technology.

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12 October 2004: DeSimone Helps Lead Nanomedicine Initiative
       
Tuesday October 12, Dr. Tony Waldrop, vice chancellor for research and economic development, inaugurates the first in a series of interdisciplinary research workshops, “Nanomedicine: Materials, Imaging, and Modeling,” as part of UNC’s response to the National Institutes of Health Roadmap initiative.
        Profs. Joseph DeSimone, professor of chemistry; Richard Superfine and Jianping Lu, professors of physics and astronomy; and Greg Forest, professor of mathematics will present this workshop to principal investigators in all areas of science who are interested in enhancing their involvement in interdisciplinary research.
        The workshop, which is organized by the UNC Roadmap Executive Committee, takes place from 4 pm to 7 pm in the Bioinformatics Bldg. auditorium. Reception will follow.
        The NIH proposed its Roadmap initiative in 2003 as “an integrated vision to deepen our understanding of biology, stimulate interdisciplinary research teams, and reshape clinical research to accelerate medical discovery and improve people's health.”
        Researchers at UNC have responded enthusiastically to this initiative, winning five major interdisciplinary grants in September. The Carolina Roadmap team will continue to facilitate interdisciplinary collaboration in response to this initiative.

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11 October 2004:  Intel Announces EUV Technology
           
Intel has reached another milestone on the path to developing a new chip manufacturing technology that will keep its factories humming well into the future.
        The chipmaker plans to reveal on Monday that it has installed the first commercial extreme ultraviolet light photolithography tool in a development facility on its Hillsboro, OR, campus.  (Click here for details.)
        Intel will use the EUV lithography tool--which "draws" lines on silicon wafers that eventually become metal circuits--to help refine a new manufacturing process that it expects to adopt during 2009.
        A lithography tool is an expensive and complex piece of machinery, with some tools costing more than $15 million. The job it performs is similar to that of a slide projector. Using a light source, a series of lenses and mirrors, and a device called a "photomask” it imprints an image of the chip's circuitry on a silicon wafer.  (Click here for details)
        Materials are then deposited and/or carved out, according to the map left there. The lines are said to be drawn, but they are actually developed through chemical reactions, in the same way that light forms images on photo negatives.
        Current lithography tools use lenses and filters to create lines on the scale of a nanometer, or a billionth of a meter. Lenses, however, are not always able to accurately project lines of under a certain length and width. EUV improves on the formula by replacing lenses with precision mirrors.
        EUV lithography tools also rely on ultraviolet light, which has a relatively short wavelength of 13.5 nanometers, to print smaller circuits. Right now, Intel's factories are using lithography tools that use 193-nanometer light sources to draw features as small as 50 nanometers.
        "First and foremost, EUV extends Intel's lithography road map, which is key to continuing scaling and continuing Moore's Law," said Ken David, the director of components research for Intel's Technology and Manufacturing Group.
        Moore's Law--which states that the number of transistors on a given chip can be doubled every two years--has been the guiding principle of progress in chip manufacturing since Intel co-founder Gordon Moore first proposed it in 1965.  (Click for here details.)
        Still, regular lithography will be used as the standard in the industry until 2009. EUV lithography will come into play when Intel starts to make chips with an average feature size of 32 nanometers. The average feature size on current cutting-edge chips is 90 nanometers.
        The installation of the first EUV lithography tool shows the technology is beginning to move out of the laboratory. However, Intel believes it will still take several years of work for EUV to work its way into the chip manufacturing mainstream.
        The chipmaker has been working on the technology for several years and is part of the EUV LLC, a research body that supports the technology.  (Click here for details.)
        It has been working with several other companies that manufacture components for lithography tools. For example, it has pledged to invest $20 million in Cymer, a company that makes light sources, to help it accelerate development of light sources for EUV lithography.
        Although it got in on EUV early, Intel probably won't be the only chipmaker to use the technology. Others, including Advanced Micro Devices, IBM, Infineon, Micron Technologies and Motorola, have joined the EUV LLC.

Courtesy of John Spooner CNETNews.com 

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27 September 2004:  Fueling Innovation: The Role of State S & T Initiatives
        Dr. Walter Plosila, Vice President of Technology Partnership Practice for  Battelle Memorial Institute, spoke at our Innovation Seminar Series on September 23, 2004. A copy of his slides is available by clicking here.  Please do not reuse these slides without Dr. Plosila's permission. A streaming video is available here (contact Ev Baucom if you do not have the password to access the file)
        Dr. Plosila discussed ways in which state governments increasingly interact with their research universities -- both in building research stature and in connecting with industry for economic growth and development. States have increasingly complemented federal basic research support, emphasizing entrepreneurial development through innovation. Technology commercialization, pre-seed and seed capital, and industry-university partnerships are examples of how States encourage this. Scientists and engineers in research institutions can be important players in these entrepreneurial efforts and examples of State partnerships will be examined.
        Dr. Plosila is recognized nationally for his innovative approaches to issues such as business-higher education partnerships, technology-driven cluster development, and public entrepreneurship strategies. He has been responsible for such nationally recognized model programs as the Ben Franklin Partnerships (Pennsylvania) and industry-led high technology regional trade associations (Maryland). In recent years he has worked with a number of universities, regional business organizations as well as states, in the development and design of technology, biosciences, and information tech strategies as well as program design and assessment, ranging from St. Louis and Indianapolis to Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, Massachusetts, and Ohio.
        Dr. Plosila has published numerous papers and articles in the areas of economic and technology development, entrepreneurship, and strategic management, most recently in the May, 2004 issue of Economic Development Quarterly, in an article entitled, "State Science- and Technology-Based Economic Development Policy: History, Trends and Developments, and Future Directions."

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12 September 2004:  STC Plays Major Role in ISSF 2005
   
    Profs. Ruben Carbonell and Keith Johnston, together with Prof. Joan Brennecke of Notre Dame U, are organizers of the 7th International Symposium on Supercritical Fluids (ISSF). The theme of ISSF 2005 is "Roads to Commercialization". The Conference will be held in Orlando, FL from May 1-4, 2005. Prof. Joe DeSimone will be a plenary speaker. Further information and registration are available at the web site http://www.issf2005.org.

        The sessions will be organized around various application areas:
                    Microelectronics
                    Reactions
                    Polymers
                    Fine Chemicals
                    Pharmaceuticals
                    Biotechnology
                    Environmental
                    Separations (analytical and large-scale)
                    Nanotechnology and novel materials
        Each topical area will include work on fundamental science and engineering (such as thermodynamics, phase behavior, transport properties, intrinsic kinetics, synthesis etc.), as well as process and product development efforts that are important for that application area.  We want to use this meeting as a major contribution to Knowledge Transfer and to provide an opportunity for CERSP faculty and students to "show their stuff" at this highly popular international meeting in the high pressure fluids area. Faculty and students are strongly encouraged to present at this meeting.  Click here for details

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11 September 2004:  CERSP Institutions Rated Among Top
       
In its annual ranking, America’s Best Colleges 2005, U. S. News has rated three CERSP among its top educational values.  Nationally UT-Austin, UNC-Chapel Hill and NC State University rank 1, 2 and 4, respectively, among public universities.  The formula used to determine which schools offer the best value relates a school's academic quality, as indicated by its U.S. News ranking, to the net cost of attendance for a student who receives the average level of financial aid. The higher the quality of the program and the lower the cost, the better the deal.   To view the ratings click here.  http://www.usnews.com/usnews/edu/college/rankings/brief/bestvalues/bvnatudoc_brief.php

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02 September 2004:  DeSimone to Receive ACS Award
       
The American Chemical Society has selected Prof. Joseph M. DeSimone to receive its 2005 Creative Invention Award.  The award will be presented at the March 2005 ACS meeting to be held in San Diego, CA.  Congratulations, Joe!

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19 August 2004:  Parry Norling Joins EAB
        We are pleased to announce that Dr. Parry M. Norling has joined the External  Advisory Board of CERSP. Parry presented a very well received talk at our Innovation Seminar on February 21, 2004; and a book to which he contributed, Next Generation Environmental Technologies, is available on our website.

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09 August 2004:  EDSTAR to Evaluate A&T Postdoc Program
        EDSTAR, Inc. has been selected to evaluate the professional service of Geoffrey Bothun, the new  postdoctoral fellow appointed by CERSP at NC A&T. EDSTAR will be compensated $16,000.00 in return for their evaluation services. Funds for the evaluation originate mainly from a recently awarded NSF Discovery Corp Postdoctoral Fellowship and will be supplemented by CERSP.

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17 June 2004:  Green Chemistry Videos Available
        A series of videos entitled "Green Chemistry: Meeting Global Challenges" is available on our website. The page is password protected. Contact baucome@email.unc.edu for the password.  Click here to access.  Instructors may broadcast materials and copy discussion questions in whole or in part for individual classroom use or for training of other instructors. No other use--and no commercial activity of any kind--is authorized.

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10 June 2004:  NC A&T Introduces EXPERT Program
       
NC A&T introduces the undergraduate research and development program EXPERT (EXperimental Program for Education in Research and Training), which is designed to increase the number of underrepresented students pursuing graduate education, convey the urgency of “green” processes and enhance research capabilities and competitiveness. EXPERT is multi-year program that combines CERSP research with personal and professional development projects. The first EXPERT research awards will be provided to incoming freshman, sophomores, juniors, and seniors for the 04-05 academic year. Click here for more information about EXPERT.

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08 June 2004:  EAB Member Honored
        Dr. Lloyd Robeson, who has served on our External Advisory Board since the inception of CERSP, has been honored by his Alma Mater, the University of Maryland. Lloyd has also represented Air Products and Chemicals in the Kenan Center for Utilization of Carbon Dioxide in Manufacturing since its inception. For details click here.

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02 June 2004:  Rossky Named to American Academy of Arts and Sciences
       
Prof. Peter Rossky, professor of chemistry at UT-Austin, has been named to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, one of the nation’s highest academic honors.  The academy, founded in 1780, is an international learned society composed of leading scientists, scholars, artists, business people and public leaders. It has 4,000 American fellows and 600 foreign honorary members.
        Prof. Rossky holds the Marvin K. Collie -Welch Regents Chair in Chemistry in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry in the College of Natural Sciences. He also is Director of the Institute for Theoretical Chemistry. He is known for his pioneering application of theoretical and computational methods in understanding the chemical and biomolecular structure and reaction dynamics of liquid solutions.   Click here for more information about Prof. Rossky.

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01 June 2004:  RECORD NUMBER OF ENGINEERING Ph.D.s AT NORTH CAROLINA A&T STATE UNIVERSITY
        In 2002, the last year for which nationwide statistics are available, 86  African Americans earned Ph.D.s in engineering. They made up only 1.7 percent of all engineering doctorates awarded by American universities.  Twenty-seven of these engineering doctorates were in the fields of mechanical or electrical engineering.
        This year North Carolina A&T State University, the historically black  institution in Greensboro, awarded 15 doctorates in electrical and mechanical engineering. This is the largest class of doctoral students in the university's history.

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25 May 2004Dr. Christine Grant Receives Presidential Award for Excellence
        Christine S. Grant was recipient of a Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics & Engineering Mentoring. The awardees are honored for encouraging women, minorities, and people with disabilities to participate in these subjects during their education. The recipients will each receive a $10,000 grant to apply to their mentoring programs.

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21 May 2004:  Four New EAB Members Appointed
        We are pleased to announce that four new members have been appointed to CERSP's External Advisory Board effective immediately. They are Ernest Bibby, Assistant Superintendent for School Improvement Planning and Technology, Granville County Schools in Oxford, N. C.; Dr. Diane Hymes, Director of Technology at Lam Research; Dr. Kenneth Carter, Research Staff Member at the IBM Almaden Research Center in San Jose, CA.; and Prof. Bala Subramaniam, Director of the NSF Engineering Research Center for Environmentally Beneficial Catalysis at the University of Kansas. For biographical information click the names above. Mr. Bibby's specialty, use of technology in teaching, is key to our efforts in education. Dr. Hymes and Dr. Carter were added to reflect CERSP's greater emphasis on microelectronics. And Prof. Subramaniam is leading an NSF Center closely related to our own.
        As excited as we are to add these new members we regret that we are losing four long-time EAB members, several of whom have been with us since our Center was established. They are Prof. Curtis Frank (Stanford U.); Dr. Denis Dibay (Leesville Road HS; Prof. Paula Hammond (MIT); and Dr. Keith Hutchenson (E. I. DuPont). We thank these retiring members for their service over the years and wish them the best. They have contributed significantly to the success of our Center.

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29 April 2004:  House Passes Green Chemistry Legislation
        By a 402-14 margin the US House of Representatives passed legislation  supporting "green chemistry" R&D.  Prospects for passage in the Senate look very promising.  For details click here.

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23 April 2004:  UNC Science Quad Dedicated to Murray
        The quad to be created north of the chemistry building in the $205 million  science complex now under construction at UNC-Chapel Hill will be named in honor of Prof. Royce Murray.  Chancellor James Moeser made the announcement during  a groundbreaking ceremony on April 21.  For details click here.

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22 April 2004:  Samulski Demonstrates Biaxial Alignment
        In work that has the potential to revolutionize liquid-crystal displays  (LCDs),  Prof. Ed Samulski and coworkers have provided unequivocal evidence of the
long-sought biaxial nematic liquid-crystal phase in boomerang-shaped molecules. The use of biaxial nematics could result in LCDs with faster refresh rates and dramatically lower power consumption. For details click here.

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14 April 2004:  Wafer Cleaning Workshop
        An on-line workshop entitled "Wafer Cleaning and Surface Preparation  Workshop" will be presented by Process Outlook Forum in connection with Sematech at 9 AM on Thursday May 6.  Click here to register (free) and to participate.

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12 April 2004:  Immersion Lithography
        Immersion lithography is gaining a great deal of attention these days.  In  fact, technology for 157nm may well never develop as interest in IL grows.  Our Center has incorporated IL into its program plans.  To learn about this  important new technology, click here for an on-line seminar presented by four industry leaders.  (You will need an media player.  Download free from www.real.com if you don't have one.)  Thanks to Webcast Technology from the editors of Semiconductor International for this on-line tutorial.
   
     Click here: Event Lobby
         For a summary of the seminar, click here.

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24 March 2004:  Key Aspects of Sustainability
        An excellent new EPA website highlights many of the key aspects of  sustainability.  As defined by EPA "sustainability" is the ability to achieve economic prosperity while protecting the natural systems of the planet, and providing a higher quality of life for its people. Individuals, communities and institutions are developing and implementing sustainability practices with the help of dozens of EPA programs, partnerships and policy tools. The new website provides links to many EPA programs and tools that contribute to sustainability. Click here to access.

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23 March 04:  Dr. Charles Prather to Speak
        Dr. Charles Prather, president of Bottom Line Innovation Associates, will speak at our Innovation Seminar Series on April 22.  Click here to access the BLIA website It contains a lot of interesting and useful links related to the innovation process.  

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22 March 04:  Green Chemistry Legislation Introduced
        On
March 17, 2004 Rep. Phil Gingrey of Georgia introduced HR 3970, the "Green  Chemistry Research and Development Act of 2004", to the Full House Committee on Science.  As proposed, $84 million will be provided over three years supporting R&D in green chemistry.  The funds are proposed to come from existing budgets of NSF, EPA, DoE and NIST.
        During testimony supporting the bill, work of our Center was cited as example  of the type of green technology being supported by NSF.  Click here to access archived video of the hearing.  Select March 17 hearings.  (A media player is needed to view.)  Reference to CERSP begins 19 minutes into the testimony.  Also of special interest to our  Center and its studies are comments of Prof. E. J. Woodhouse found 51.5 and 70 minutes into the proceedings.

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08 March 04:  Live Streaming Discontinued
   
     Live streaming of our videoconferences has been temporarily discontinued due to problems with the server. Streaming video will be available on Fridays following the seminars and will remain on-line for four weeks. The link is password protected. Please contact baucome@email.unc.edu for the password.  If you already have the password, please click here to view video. You will need a media player. Click here for a free download.

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01 March 04:  DeSimone Speaks at Microelectronics Forum
   
     On January 21 Joe DeSimone presented the paper "The Use of a Dry™ CO2-based Technologies for the Enhanced Fabrication of Microelectronic Devices" at the FSI and Solid State Technology/PennWell Process Outlook Forum, a web-based symposium. The talk provides a good overview of our vision of a totally "dry" process for microelectronics using CO2. Click here  and select the January 21 seminar to access this presentation.
   
     As a service to the industry, FSI and Solid State Technology/PennWell are providing an easy, convenient and free means for industry professionals to hear the latest on a wide range of processing areas from respected experts. As the roadmap becomes more challenging, a good approach is to have on-going dialogue about industry trends and challenges. Many industry professionals worldwide have found the information sharing and discussion of ideas that occur in the Process Outlook Forum to be of great value.
   
     The 2003 Process Outlook Forum events attracted users from nearly 200 companies, including strong participation from across the U.S., Europe and Asia. Approximately 75 percent of 2003 registrants were employees of semiconductor manufacturers, material suppliers or equipment companies. The Process Outlook Forum, which was launched in March 2003, is designed to provide value to engineers, researchers and others in the semiconductor industry by addressing the full spectrum of issues pertaining to IC process technology challenges. The convenient, open format of the program allows registrants to access and download the material, including presentations and an audio MP3 recording, at any time - even weeks after an event takes place. Registration for the Process Outlook Forum is free and open to anyone. Click here to register  then click on the session you want to hear/view.

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21 February 2004:  Dr. Norling Addresses CERCP on Innovation
   
     Dr. Parry Norling Fellow of the Chemical Heritage Foundation and past Fellow  of the Rand Corporation, and retired Executive of E. I. du Pont, addressed  CERSP as part of our Personal Development Program. The title of the talk was "Innovation in Next Generation Environmental Technologies: Benefits and Barriers". Dr. Norling presented several case histories of successful innovations.  He highlighted the many barriers to innovation that must be overcome and the  dedication and vision necessary for success. The talk was attended by about 50  members and was very well received. 
bulletClick here to view Dr. Norling's slides. 
Case Study:
bulletPreface:  "Next Generation Environmental Technologies"
bulletSummary
bulletChapter 1:  Introduction
bulletChapter 2:  What are the Next Generation Environmental Technologies?
bulletChapter 3:  Mechanisms for Gaining Benefits from NGETs
bulletChapter 4:  Lessons from Case Studies
bulletChapter 5:  Long Term Opportunities for NGETs
bulletChapter 6:  Conclusions & Observations
bulletAppendix A:  Descriptions of the 25 Cases
bulletAppendix B:  Government Policies & Increased Adoption of NGETs
bulletAppendix C:  Opportunities for Further Study:  Additional Cases from 1st International Conference on Green & Sustainable Chemistry, Tokyo, March 2003

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18 February 2004:  Waters Receives Sloan Fellowship
   
     Congratulations to Prof. Marcey Waters on receiving an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship.  Sloan Research Fellowships are designed to identify those who show the most outstanding promise of making fundamental contributions to new knowledge. Sloan Research Fellows, once chosen, are free to pursue whatever lines of inquiry are of the most compelling interest to them. Their Sloan funds can be applied to a wide variety of uses for which other, more restricted funds such as research project grants cannot usually be employed. Former Fellows report that this flexibility often gives the fellowships a value well beyond their dollar amounts. 
        Aside from the monetary aspect of the fellowships, less tangible benefits have been cited by former Fellows. The early recognition of distinguished performance which the fellowships confer, after years of arduous preparation, was said to be immensely encouraging and a stimulus to personal and career development. Twenty-six Sloan Fellows have won Nobel Prizes later in their careers, and hundreds have received other honors.
        Prof. Waters’ CERSP projects include NMR
investigation of peptide structures in CO2 and planned collaboration with Ruben Carbonell on fixing enzymes on inert substrates for biocatalysis in CO2.

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bullet05 February 2004:  NC State and UNC-CH Open Nanotechnology Center
   
     A new research facility designed for the fabrication of very small things may have a big impact on the Triangle’s high-tech science and business scene.
   
     More than 150 leaders from North Carolina State University , the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , the University of North Carolina system, industry and government gathered to celebrate the opening of the Triangle National Lithography Center (TNLC) on Tuesday, Jan. 20, at the Engineering Graduate Research Center on NC State’s Centennial Campus.
   
     The new state-of-the-art center will allow faculty and students at UNC-Chapel Hill and NC State, along with industry partners, to take a huge step forward in the cutting-edge field of nanofabrication – the design and manufacture of computer chips and other devices so small they’re measured in nanometers – one-billionth of a meter.
   
     Attendees toured the new facility and view its high-tech gem--a multimillion dollar, 193-nanometer lithography stepper. This stepper was committed, in part, as matching funds provided by the University in support of the NSF Science and Technology Center for Environmentally Responsible Solvents and Processes.  Computer chips, molecular electronics devices, and opto-electronics devices are just a few of the items that can be produced with the stepper, researchers say. Other nanoscale technology that can be produced by the tool includes “lab-on-a-chip” devices that can, for example, screen biologically active reagents like anthrax.
   
     It is believed that no other institute of higher education has such a state-of-the-art tool for nanofabrication.
   
     NC State Chancellor Marye Anne Fox; UNC-Chapel Hill Chancellor James Moeser; Dr. Russ Lea, representing the UNC system; Dr. Robert McMahan, science advisor to Gov.
Mike Easley and executive director of the North Carolina Board of Science & Technology; and Dr. Joe DeSimone, Kenan Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering at UNC-Chapel Hill and NC State, spoke briefly at the ceremony. 

   
     Click here for details of the TNLC.
        Click here for video of the dedication.
(streaming file requires Real Player)

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bullet04 February 2004:  Skunky Beer and Microchips

Q.     What do skunky beer and microchips have in common? 
A.     Prof. Malcolm
Forbes. 

    As part of CERSP thrust area on Microelectronics, Prof. Forbes will study darkening of polymers exposed to 193nm ultraviolet radiation. He is also using this equipment in a collaborative study with Belgian chemists on how beer degrades on exposure to light. The study is the subject of a documentary to air on Belgian public TV. To read the full story click here.

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bullet03 February 2004: High Pressure Safety Video (streaming file requires Real Player)
         The DeSimone group has produced a video on safe assembly and operation of high pressure cells using carbon dioxide. Click here to view the video.

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bullet02 February 2004: Science Article by Johnston Group
   
     An article entitled "Making Nanoscale Materials with Supercritical Fluids" by Keith Johnston and Parag Shah was published in the January 23 issue of Science 303, 482-483 (2004). The authors describe success in their lab in using templates to replicate nanoscale structures using supercritical fluids. Click here to access the online version .

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bullet30 January 2004:  Designing for Innovation
   
     In his PhD dissertation at the North Carolina State University School of Design, Umut Toker has shown that the level of innovation in a research center is heavily influenced by physical factors such as sight lines. The easier it is for people to see each other as they move around the building, the more chance encounters they will have. The more often they encounter one another, the more often they will engage in impromptu technical discussions. And the more often they communicate, the faster they will come up with new ideas. For details click here.

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bullet23 January 2004:  2004 CERSP Orientation Meeting Held
   
     An overview of CERSP including planned directions for Phase II of the Center, 2004-2009, was conducted by Prof. J. M. DeSimone on January 8, 2004. For details click here.  Summary of plans for individual thrust areas will be held at 3:00PM in our usual video conference rooms as follows: Jan 15-Nanostructures, Jan 29-Macromolecules, and Feb 12-Microelectronics. CERSP students, faculty and potential collaborators are urged to attend.

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